Selected Patents Relating to Oils and Fats 2008

The following list contains brief details of current patents, which appeared to the editor to be especially relevant. Inevitably, there is an element of subjectivity in the choice. Topics included in the list are based on the Divisions of the AOCS and the topical sessions held at the AOCS annual meetings. Patents are listed here at intervals as they are published in Inform.

 

Active soluble cleaning composite of natural state using soybean fatty acids and the making method thereof (Choi, K., Green & Clean, Inc., Seoul, South Korea, July 24, 2007, US7247607B2).

Disclosed is an active and water-soluble natural detergent composite using soybean fatty acid and lecithin, and a method of producing the same. The method comprises agitating a mixture consisting of a natural vegetable fatty acid, lecithin, alkanolamide, and an organic solvent such as higher alcohol or polyhydric alcohol, saponifying the mixture to form microscopic detergent particles moving according to Brownian movement, and controlling the resulting detergent in terms of moisture and pH to allow the resulting detergent to be in a neutral or alkaline state. The detergent composite comprises 14 to 22 parts by weight of soybean fatty acid, 2 to 4 parts by weight of lecithin, 6 to 14 parts by weight of alkanolamide, 15 parts by weight of isooctylphenoxy polyoxyethoxy ethanol, 42 parts by weight of distilled water, 10 parts by weight of p-tert-oxyphenoxy polyethoxy ethanol, and 3 parts by weight of ethylene diamine tetracetic acid.

Transesterification and esterification of fatty acids and triglycerides by dispersion and dispersion method for the production of fatty acid methylesters (Gapes, R., and Baumgartner, H., July 24, 2007, US7247739B2).

The invention relates to a method for the basic or acidic catalyzed esterification and transesterification of fatty acids, such as oils and fats, by dispersion of low alcohols, especially methyl alcohol, in the liquidic initial product. The invention is characterized in that the methyl alcohol (or other low alcohols) is fully dispersed in the reaction mixture. The invention also relates to embodiments of said method.

Process for selective hydrogenation using a catalytic reactor with a hydrogen-selective membrane (Chau, C., and Uzio, D., Inst. Français du petrole, Rueil-Malmaison Codex, France, July 31, 2007, US7250544B2).

A process for selective hydrogenation of polyunsaturated compounds that are contained in a hydrocarbon feedstock in the presence of a catalytic reactor with a hydrogen-selective membrane comprises (i) the introduction of said feedstock co-mixed with a first amount hydrogen into a reaction zone of said reactor, (ii) the contact of a second amount hydrogen with the upstream face of the membrane, which is inorganic and porous, then (iii) the catalytic reaction of the feedstock with hydrogen that has selectively traversed the membrane.

Transesterification composition of fatty acid esters, and uses thereof (Mosier, B., and Duffy, B., MJ Res. Ltd. Partnership, Houston, Texas, USA, August 7, 2007, US7252779B2).

This invention is a composition that includes a transesterified fatty acid ester resulting from the reaction of a fatty acid ester, in the presence of an acid, with a hydroxyl-containing compound. The fatty acid esters of the invention are selected from those with a carbon number of 8 to 20. The hydroxyl-containing compound is an alcohol having a carbon number between 1 and 18. The resulting composition is useful as a lubricant, as a heat transfer agent, as a rheological modifier, and as a corrosion/moisture inhibitor, among other uses.

Process for producing fatty acid salt and livestock feed containing the fatty acid salt (Nakata, M., Nichiyu Solution Inc., Tokyo, Japan, August 14, 2007, US7255873B2).

The invention is directed to a method for producing a fatty acid salt, the method comprising reacting a fatty acid with a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide by use of an extruder having at least a stock supply zone, a kneading/reaction zone, and a cooling zone. The invention provides a high-productivity, highly efficient method for continuously producing a fatty acid salt and a method for effectively producing a fatty acid salt having a high unsaturated fatty acid content and a low melting temperature.

Fatty acid esters and uses thereof (Pollock, C., and Nelson, L., Arizona Chem., Jacksonville, Florida, USA, August 14, 2007, US7256162B2).

Esters formed from polyol, C12–C28 branched chain fatty acid, and/or C12–C28 cyclic fatty acid are useful as a friction modifier for lubricants. Monomer is a preferred source for these fatty acids.

Combined use of triglycerides containing medium-chain fatty acids and exogenous lipolytic enzymes as feed supplements (Decuypere, J., and Dierick, N., Vitamex N V & Aveve N.V., both of Belgium, August 28, 2007, US7261888B1).

The present invention relates to the use of triglycerides (TG) containing medium-chain fatty acids (C4 to C12), combined with exogenous lipolytic enzymes (esterases or lipases) as a feed supplement for animals, providing improvement of growth without the use of contested feed additives.

Catalyst for production of unsaturated aldehyde and unsaturated carboxylic acid, and process for its production (Teshigahara, I., and Kanuka, N., Mitsubishi Chem Corp., Tokyo, Japan, August 28, 2007, US7262148B2).

A catalyst for producing from an olefin the corresponding unsaturated aldehyde and unsaturated carboxylic acid in good yield, and a process for its production, are presented. The catalyst comprises a composite oxide catalyst containing at least molybdenum, bismuth, and iron, to be used at the time of gas-phase catalytic oxidation of an olefin with a molecular oxygen-containing gas to produce the corresponding unsaturated aldehyde and unsaturated carboxylic acid.

Process for preparing blown vegetable oil (Christianson, R., and others, South Dakota Soybean Processors, Volga, South Dakota, USA, August 28, 2007, US7262311B2).

A method for partially refining a crude vegetable oil utilizing physical refining techniques is described. The crude vegetable oil is first degummed by either (i) allowing the crude oil to settle over a period of time, such as 20 days, so that the oil becomes stratified into at least two layers, wherein one layer in enriched in gums and a second layer is enriched in oil, then separating the crude oil layer from the gum layer, or (ii) heating the crude oil to a temperature of about 270–300°F (132–149°C) with agitation and then allowing the crude oil to settle for a period of time until the oil becomes stratified into the at least two layers. The degummed oil is then aerated and agitated while being maintained at a temperature of 170–180°F (77–82°C) for a time period sufficient to obtain a desired oil viscosity. The resulting partially refined oil is suitable for use in industrial applications such as the preparation of urethane foams.

Plants having mutant delta-12 desaturase sequences that confer altered fatty acid profiles (Debonte, L., and others, Cargill Inc., Wayzata, Minnesota, USA, August 28, 2007, US7262343B1).

Brassicaceae plants are disclosed that contain a mutation in a Δ-12 fatty acid desaturase gene and that have altered fatty acid composition in seeds. In one embodiment, a Brassicaceae plant contains a mutation in a region having the conserved motif His-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-His, found in Δ-12 and Δ-15 fatty acid desaturases. A preferred motif has the sequence His-Glu-Cys-Gly-His. A preferred mutation in this motif has the amino acid sequence His-Lys-Cys-Gly-His.

Enzymatic resolution of propylene glycol alkyl (or aryl) ethers and ether acetates (Resnick, S., and others, Dow Global Technologies Inc., Midland, Michigan, USA, September 4, 2007, US7264960B2).

Glycol ether acetates, and in particular propylene glycol alkyl (or aryl) ether acetates, can be resolved enzymatically by enantioselective hydrolysis with a hydrolase at high concentrations of substrates; in some embodiments, the hydrolase is a lipase. Glycol ethers, and in particular propylene glycol alkyl (or aryl) ethers, can be resolved enzymatically by enantioselective transesterification with a hydrolase, in the presence of an acyl donor, at high concentrations of substrates; in some embodiments, the hydrolase is a lipase.

Wax emulsion coating applications (Borsinger, G., and Hussan, A., Marcus Oil and Chemical, Houston, Texas, USA, September 11, 2007, US7267743B2).

Waxes prepared from hydrogenated plant oils, such as castor, palm, and soybean, are used to prepare water-based emulsions. The inventive waxes, obtained from naturally derived, renewable resources, were emulsified under anionic, cationic, and nonionic conditions, producing emulsions having a solids content up to about 45% solids. When used to coat fibrous cellulosic articles, such as paperboard, the emulsions’ performance was similar to that of emulsions containing petroleum-derived waxes. The inventive waxes have a low iodine value (between 2 and 5), and melting points between approximately 120 and 200°F (Mettler drop point). These waxes comprise a triglyceride whose fatty acids are predominantly stearic acid or ricinoleic acid. The inventive waxes are used as an alternative to petroleum-derived, or expensive, naturally occurring waxes in the manufacture of emulsions used in coatings, polishes, adhesives, paper products, paperboard, in the removal of ink from fibrous cellulosic products and other manufacturing operations.

Acyltransferases for alteration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and oil content in oleaginous yeasts (Yadav, N., and Zhang, H., Du Pont, Wilmington, Delaware, USA, September 11, 2007, US7267976B2).

Two acyltransferases are provided, suitable for use in the manufacture of microbial oils enriched in omega fatty acids in oleaginous yeast (e.g., Yarrowia lipolytica). Specifically, the genes encoding phosphatidylcholine-diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT2) have been isolated from Y. lipolytica. These genes encode enzymes that participate in the terminal step in oil biosynthesis in yeast.

Environmentally benign anti-icing or deicing fluids employing triglyceride processing by-products (Sapienza, R., and others, MLI Associates LLC, Westerville, Ohio, USA, September 18, 2007, US7270768B2).

Deicing compositions comprised of glycerol-containing by-products of triglyceride-processing processes are disclosed.

Lipolytic enzyme genes (Tsutsumi, N., and others, Novozymes A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark, September 18, 2007, US7271139B2).

The inventors have isolated novel lipolytic enzyme genes with a high homology to the Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase gene and thus well suited for use in gene shuffling. Accordingly, the invention provides a method of generating genetic diversity into lipolytic enzymes by family shuffling of two or more homologous genes that encode lipolytic enzymes. The DNA shuffling technique is used to create a library of shuffled genes, and this is expressed in a suitable expression system and the expressed proteins are screened for lipolytic enzyme activity. The invention also provides a polynucleotide comprising a nucleotide sequence encoding a lipolytic enzyme and a lipolytic enzyme (a polypeptide with lipolytic enzyme activity).

Stabilized ester compositions and their use in film-forming compositions (Bloom, P., Archer Daniels Midland Co., Decatur, Illinois, USA, September 18, 2007, US7271210B2).

This invention relates to a composition comprising a stabilized furfural or glycol ester of a vegetable oil fatty acid and an antioxidant such as butylated hydroxytoluene. This invention also relates to latex film-forming compositions containing stabilized furfural or glycol esters, such as a stabilized propylene glycol monoester (PGME) mixture. This invention is also directed to methods of stabilizing furfural or glycol esters of a vegetable fatty acid by contacting the esters with an antioxidant such as butylated hydroxytoluene. This invention also includes methods of preparing film-forming compositions comprising a stabilized furfural or glycol ester, such as the stabilized PGME mixture disclosed herein.

Process for preparing vegetable oil fractions rich in non-tocolic, high-melting, unsaponifiable matter (Mellerup, J., and others, Aarhuskarlshamn Denmark A/S, Aarhus, Denmark, October 30, 2007, US7288278B2).

A vegetable oil fraction rich in non-tocolic, high-melting, unsaponifiable matter is prepared by the following steps: A vegetable oil having a slip melting point of not more than 30°C and a content of unsaponifiable matter of at least 0.5% by weight is hydrogenated to fully saturate the fatty acids of the glycerides and to reach a slip melting point of at least 57°C. To the hydrogenated oil is added from 1 to 75% by weight of the unhydrogenated starting oil or another oil having a slip melting point of not more than 30°C in order to act as a carrier and vehicle for the unsaponifiable matter. Then, a solvent is added to the oil mixture in a ratio between oil and solvent from 1:2 to 1:20, and the mixture is heated to transparency. The oil/solvent mixture is cooled in one or more steps to a final temperature in the range from -35 to +30°C, and the precipitated high-melting fraction(s) is (are) filtered off. The filtrate is desolventized, leaving a fraction rich in unsaponifiable matter. By this process very high concentrations of, in particular, the non-tocolic, higher-melting unsaponifiables can be achieved, and the composition of the glyceridic part of the enriched fraction can be tailored to specific applications. Also, a novel blood cholesterol-lowering effect of the unsaponifiable constituents from shea butter has been found.

Antiasthmatic combinations comprising surface active phospholipids (Hills, B., and others, Britannia Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Redhill, Great Britain, September 25, 2007, US7273604B2).

Disclosed is a combination product for use in treating asthma and other respiratory conditions comprising a medicament comprising a surface-active phospholipid composition in the form of a fine powder and an antiasthma drug. The product is arranged to be administered to the lungs by inhalation, for example, by the disclosed devices.

Method of reacting carboxylic acids (Watts, P., and Haswell, S., University of Hull, Hull, Great Britain, October 9, 2007, US7279082B2).

A carboxylic acid molecule (R–COOH) is subjected to an electric field in a microreactor. The molecule decarboxylates to form a radical (R–). Two radicals (R–) can dimerize to form the product (R––R).

Poly(hydroxy thioether) vegetable oil derivatives useful as lubricant additives (Erhan, S., and others, USDA and Penn State Res. Found., Washington, DC and University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, October 9, 2007, US7279448B2).

A novel class of chemically modified vegetable oils is prepared by reacting epoxidized triglyceride oils with thiols. The resultant poly(hydroxy thioether) derivatives have utility as antiwear/antifriction additives for environmentally friendly industrial oils and automotive applications.

Chemically modified lipolytic enzyme (Callisen, T., and others, Novozymes A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark, Ocotber 16, 2007, US7282233B2).

Lipolytic enzymes are chemically modified by covalently linking one or more (particularly 1-3) hydrophobic groups to the enzyme molecule. The chemical modification improves the performance of the lipolytic enzyme, e.g., in baking or in detergents.

Method and device for hydrolytically obtaining a carboxylic acid and alcohol from the corresponding carboxylic ester (Michl, H., and Ramgraber, F., Wacker Chemie AG, Munich, Germany, October 30, 2007, US7288675B2).

A process and apparatus for hydrolytic cleavage of carboxylic esters and water into carboxylic acid and alcohol hydrolysis products. In the process, a portion of water required for hydrolysis is replaced by a recycled mixture of carboxylic acid and water from previously hydrolyzed carboxylic ester.

Methods for producing α-substituted carboxylic acids using nitrilases and Strecker reagents (Madden, M., and others, Verenium Corporation, San Diego, California, USA, November 27, 2007, US7300775B2).

In accordance with the present invention there are provided methods for producing enantiomerically pure α-substituted carboxylic acids, such as, for example, α-amino acids and α-hydroxy acids, said method comprising combining an aldehyde or ketone with a cyanide and ammonia or an ammonium salt or an amine, in the presence of a nitrilase or a polypeptide having nitrilase activity which stereoselectively hydrolyzes the amino nitrile or cyanohydrin intermediate under conditions sufficient to produce the enantiomerically pure α-substituted carboxylic acid, such as, for example, α-amino acids and α-hydroxy acids.

Method for preparing ester condensate (Ishihara, K., and Yamamoto, H., Japan Science and Technology Corp., Kawaguchi-Shi, Saitama, Japan, November 27, 2007, US7301045B2).

The present invention provides a green chemistry method for preparing ester or thioester that can conduct catalytic esterification reaction with an equimolar amount of carboxylic acid and alcohol, or catalytic thioesterification reaction with carboxylic acid and an equimolar amount or small amount of thiol. By using hafnium chloride (IV), especially tetravalent hafnium compounds represented by hafnium chloride (IV)(THF)2 or hafnium (IV) t-butoxide as a (poly) condensation catalyst, direct condensation reaction is conducted from carboxylic acid and an equimolar amount of alcohol or a little smaller amount of thiol, in the nonpolar solvent such as toluene and the like, in a deoxidization atmosphere and under heating reflux, and the reaction synthesizes ester monomer or thioester monomer, polyester or polythioester. When heating reflux is conducted by using a nonpolar solvent, it is preferable to remove azeotropic water from the reaction system.

Molecular fingerprinting of triglycerides in biological samples by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (Gross, R., and Han, X., Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, December 11, 2007, US7306952B2).

A method for determination of at least one of the triglyceride (TG) molecular species in a biological sample, comprising subjecting the sample to lipid extraction to obtain a lipid extract and subjecting the resulting lipid extract to two-dimensional (2D) electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MS/MS) with neutral loss scanning of all naturally occurring aliphatic chains and contour analysis of 2D intercept peaks. A method for determination of tricylglyceride content and/or TG molecular species directly from a lipid extract of a biological sample comprising subjecting said lipid extract to ESI/MS/MS.

Sterol derivatives, liposomes comprising sterol derivatives and method for loading liposomes with active substances (Panzner, S. and others, Novosom AG, Halle, Germany, December 25, 2007, US7312206B2).

Disclosed is a sterol derivative having a pKa value of 3.5–8 according to the general formula cation-spacer 2-Y-spacer 1-X-sterol, wherein Y and X represent bonding groups. The invention also relates to liposomes containing said sterol derivatives.

Non-lauric, non-trans, non-temper fat compositions (Bach, M. and Juul, B., Aarhuskarlshamn Denmark AS, Aarhus, Denmark, December 18, 2007, US7309508B2).

A non-lauric, non-trans, non-temper fat composition comprising a fraction obtained from a randomized triglyceride mixture in which min. 90% by weight of the constituent fatty acids are: palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), arachidic (20:0), behenic (22:0), oleic (18:1), and linoleic (18:2) acid and the total content of arachidic and behenic acid is 3–40% by weight and the total content of palmitic and stearic acids is 25–60% by weight, said fraction having the following physical and chemical properties: (i) slip melting point measured according to AOCS Cc 3-25: below 36°C, and solid fat content measured according to IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) 2.150 mod. (stabilized at 20°C for 24 h): above 25% by weight at 20°C; (ii) total content of saturated fatty acids measured according to IUPAC 2.301 and 2.304: 40–75% by weight, preferably 45–70% by weight; (iii) total content of arachidic and behenic acids: 3–40% by weight, preferably 5–35% by weight, and total content of palmitic and stearic acids: 25–60% by weight, preferably 25–50% by weight, both measured according to IUPAC 2.301 and 2.304; (iv) total content of triglycerides having triglyceride composition of C56–C60 measured by number of total carbon atoms of constituent fatty acids according to IUPAC 2.323: min. 9% by weight, preferably min. 15% by weight; (v) total content of S2U-type triglycerides: min. 25% by weight, preferably min. 35% by weight, where S = saturated fatty acids and U = unsaturated fatty acids.

Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, inhibitors thereof and use of the same in diagnosis and therapy (MacPhee, C. and others, SmithKline Beecham Corp., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, January 1, 2008, US7314742B2).

The enzyme Lp-PLA2 in purified form, an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding Lp-PLA2, the use of an inhibitor of the enzyme Lp-PLA2 in therapy and a method of screening compounds to identify those compounds which inhibit the enzyme.

Soybean oil process (Tysinger, J., and others, Carolina Soy Products LLC, Warsaw, North Carolina, USA, January 1, 2008, US7314944B2).

A solvent extraction-free, caustic refining-free, process for producing refined soybean oil from soybeans is described in which soybeans, after cleaning, cracking and dehulling, are crushed in less than 60 seconds while heating the soybeans to a frictionally generated temperature of from about 300°F to about 370°F. Free fatty acids are then removed through physical refining, instead of previously employed caustic refining, since the low level of nonhydratable phospholipids does not create undesirable flavors during the physical refining process. The resultant oil exhibits a significantly greater frylife that nonhydrogenated soybean oil produced by solvent extraction and caustic refining.

Plant fatty acid amide hydrolases (Chapman, K., and others, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas, USA, January 8, 2008, US7316928B2).

The invention provides plant fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) coding sequences. Also provided are constructs comprising these sequences, plants transformed therewith, and methods of use thereof. The invention allows the modification of plants for FAAH activity and N-acylethanolamine levels. Such modification may be used to produce plants that are improved with respect to growth, seed germination, pathogen response, and stress tolerance.

Cooking oil antioxidant composition, method of preparation and use (Friedman, B., and Bielska, B., Oil Proc. Systems Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, January 22, 2008, US7320809B2).

Frying processes utilizing cooking oil at elevated temperatures can cause various degradation effects in the oil including oxidation, hydrolysis, and/or polymerization. In the absence of additives to protect the oil, the nutritional profile and cooking performance of degraded oil diminish the quality of food cooked therein. The disclosed methods and compositions provide beneficial and cost-effective improvements in the cooking performance of oil used at elevated temperatures, for example, in food frying equipment.

Fat-emulsions (Van Bodegom, B., and Tjokrodihardjo, S., Unilever Bestfoods North America, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, USA, February 5, 2008, US7326431B2).

The invention provides water-continuous or bicontinuous fat emulsions, comprising fat, protein, humectants, and relatively low amounts of water and which emulsions display a water activity of 0.6 to 0.8 and have a shelf life at ambient temperature of more than 6 months. A method of preparing the emissions is also provided.

Phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferases (Butler, K., and others, DuPont, Wilmington, Delaware, USA, February 5, 2008, US7326828B2).

This invention relates to an isolated nucleic acid fragment encoding an acyltransferase, more specifically a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase. The invention also relates to the construction of a recombinant DNA construct encoding all or a portion of the phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, in sense or antisense orientation, wherein expression of the recombinant DNA construct results in production of altered levels of the phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase in a transformed host cell.

Liquid laundry detergent compositions comprising a silicone blend of nonfunctionalized and amino-functionalized silicone polymers (Delplancke, P., and others, Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, February 5, 2008, US7326677B2).

The invention is directed to liquid laundry detergent compositions for treating nonkeratinous substrates under domestic wash conditions, such composition comprising (i) at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, zwitterionic surfactants, amphoteric surfactants, and combinations thereof; (ii) a silicone blend comprising a nonfunctionalized silicone and a functionalized silicone; and (iii) at least one additional nonsilicone laundry adjunct selected from the group consisting of detergent builders, detersive enzymes, dye transfer-inhibiting agents, and combinations thereof. The claimed compositions are further essentially free of any coacervate phase-forming polymer and essentially free of any cationic deposition aid.

Bars and confectioneries containing cocoa solids having a high cocoa polyphenol content and sterol/stanol esters and processes for their preparation (Chimel, M., and others, Mars Inc., McLean, Virginia, USA, February 12, 2008, US7329429B2).

Processes are provided for preparing ready-to-eat health bars such as chocolate granola bars and chocolate confectioneries such as dark or milk chocolate chews. The bars and confectioneries contain sterol ester(s) and/or stanol esters and cocoa solids having a high cocoa procyanidin content. The cocoa solids are pretreated with the sterol/stanol ester(s) or other edible oils or fats during the preparation of the products to prevent the loss of cocoa procyanidins. Other particulate antioxidants can be pretreated with food-grade fats and/or oils or emulsifiers such as lecithin to conserve their effectiveness.

Soy protein isolate (Cho, M., and others, Solae LLC, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, February 19, 2008, US7332192B2).

A soy protein isolate and method for preparing the same are shown. The novel soy protein isolate possesses excellent suspension stability and flavor. The process used to produce the soy protein isolate includes an enzyme hydrolysis process, and the resulting soy protein isolate can be used in acidic beverage formulations.

Treatment of vegetable oils or animal fats with sulfur or nitrogen donor compounds for animal food flavorings (Nelles, L., and others, Applied Food Biotech Inc., O’Fallon, Missouri, USA, February 12, 2008, US7329426B2).

Oils or fats from plants and/or animals are chemically treated to create flavor/palatability enhancer (FPE) products for use with animal foods, such as dog or cat food. This method involves mixing triglycerides (from the oil or fat) with sulfur and/or nitrogen donor compounds, such as sodium sulfide. The mixture is cooked at a temperature close to boiling, or higher if pressure-cooking is used, for a period of time sufficient to break down large numbers of triglyceride molecules into their constituent fatty acids and other fragments. Under suitable cooking conditions, the organic fragments will react with sulfur and/or nitrogen atoms from the donor compound(s) to form relatively small organic molecules containing sulfur and/or nitrogen. These cooked products can be used as FPE for pet foods for dry kibbles or biscuits, either alone, or mixed with a standard base compound such as a hydrolyzed liver digest. Two-bowl comparison tests indicate that these FPE are effective, and they do not suffer from unpleasant odors that would disturb pet owners. This method can be used to process various types of fatty or oily wastes created by food-service or manufacturing operations, and because the cooking process will totally sterilize the ingredients, it can be used with contaminated, adulterated, or partially spoiled food substances that are not adequately safe for human consumption.

Rustproofing composition (Maeda, T., and others, Honda Motor Co., Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2008, US7338985B2).

A rustproofing composition has superior properties satisfying rustproofing quality requirements and workability requirements for car underbodies, parts around tires, parts with pockets, plate-bonded parts or the like of car bodies, and containing volatile organic solvent of 20 mass % or less. In a rustproofing composition containing ultraviolet (UV)-curable resin and photopolymerizing initiator and at least one of rustproofing oil and rustproofing wax, the content of nonvolatile component at 105°C for 3 hours in the rustproofing oil and rustproofing wax is 80 mass % or more, the UV curable resin and photopolymerizing initiator are dissolved or dispersed in the rustproofing oil and rustproofing wax, and the UV curable resin is contained at 0.3 to 10 weight % to the total weight of the composition.

Beverages containing plant sterols (Lerchenfeld, E., and Striegel, D., Coca Cola Co., Atlanta, Georgia, USA, February 26, 2008, US7335389B2).

The invention relates to a process for producing a substantially stable dispersion of a hydrophobic plant sterol and an aqueous material without manufacturing aids. The plant sterol is a plant sterol or a plant stanol. The plant sterol is mixed with the aqueous material to form a first dispersion, which is heated and homogenized to obtain a second dispersion of particles. The particle size of the hydrophobic plant sterol particles in the first dispersion and the second dispersion is from about 0.1 micron to about 30 microns. In one embodiment, the aqueous material consists essentially of a beverage concentrate, which includes a juice concentrate, such as a citrus juice concentrate, e.g., an orange juice concentrate. The majority of hydrophobic plant sterol particles within this range will be from about 0.2 microns to about 10 microns and will substantially follow a bell curve distribution. This composition may include manufacturing aids selected from food grade emulsifiers, gums, starches, and pectins.

Decreased fat absorption with an anti-lipase antibody (Pimentel, J., March 18, 2008, US7344713B1).

A method for the decrease of fat absorption in a mammal, wherein the animal is orally fed an antibody produced against lipase, an enzyme which is required for fat absorption.

Cream alternatives (Bot, A., and others, Unilever Bestfoods North America, March 18, 2008, US7344748B2).

Our invention concerns spreadable and/or spoonable water-continuous, gelatin-free cream alternatives comprising 10 to 50 wt% of a fat blend and up to 5 wt% of a biopolymer other than gelatin as a thickener, in addition to water as continuous phase, which creams display a Stevens value at 5°C (S5) of more than 100 grams, while the fat blend comprises vegetable fat(s) and 5 to 75 wt% of dairy fat and which fat blend displays a solid fat index (NMR-pulse on stabilized fat) at 5°C (N5) and at 15°C (N15) such that the ratio between N15 and N5 (i.e., N15/N5) is less than 0.60.

Method for synthesizing ceramide-type compounds (Lassalle, L., and Yvernauk, F., March 18, 2008, US7344868B2).

The invention relates to the fields of fatty substance chemistry, specifically of the ceramide-type compound synthesis. The invention resides substantially in the synthesis of ceramide-type compounds. Specifically, the aim of the invention is a new enzymatic synthesis method, comprising at least one amidification step and one esterification step, achieved through lipases, among fatty acids and/or esters thereof and amino alcohols. The resulting ceramide-type compounds can be used as cosmetic and/or pharmaceutical compositions, in particular as dermatological compositions in conjunction or in admixture with one or more suitable cosmetic and/or pharmaceutical excipients or carriers. The method has an interest particularly in the synthesis of active compounds useful in the fields of cosmetology and/or pharmacology and specifically of dermatology.

Water-resistant vegetable protein adhesive dispersion compositions (Wescott, J., and Frihart, C., Heartland Resource Technologies and the USDA, March 18, 2008, US7345136B2).

Water-resistant, protein-based adhesive dispersion compositions and methods for preparing them are provided. The adhesive dispersions are prepared by copolymerizing a denatured vegetable protein, such as soy flour, that has been functionalized with methylol groups with one or more reactive co-monomers, and preparing an acidic dispersion of the adhesive. The adhesive dispersions exhibit superior water resistance, and can be used to bond wood substrates, such as panels or laminate, or in the preparation of composite materials.

Fatty-acid amide hydrolase (Gilula, N., and others, Scripps Research Institute, March 25, 2008, US7348173B2).

The soporific (sleep-inducing) activity of cis-9,10-octadecenoamide and other soporific fatty acid primary amides is neutralized by hydrolysis in the presence of fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Hydrolysis of cis-9,10-octadecenoamide by FAAH leads to the formation of oleic acid, a compound without soporific activity. FAAH has been isolated and the gene encoding FAAH has been cloned, sequenced, and used to express recombinant FAAH. Inhibitors of FAAH are disclosed to block the hydrolase activity.

Whippable food product with improved stability (Perks, C., and others, Rich Products Corp., April 1, 2008, US7351440B2).

A whippable food product having improved stability characteristics without detectable change in the organoleptic characteristics is provided. The product comprises triglyceride fat, one or more sugars, and an emulsifier component comprising destabilizing and stabilizing emulsifiers in amounts sufficient to stabilize the product. This product can be stored at ambient temperatures for extended periods of time and can also be whipped and displayed at ambient temperatures.

Mild, low soluble soap bars which have non-slimy quick rinse perception in use (Moaddel, T., and others, Unilever Home & Personal Care, April 1, 2008, US7351682B2).

The invention discloses bar compositions that are milder than soap but have squeaky feel or rinse associated with soap. This is accomplished by ensuring at least a certain portion (at least 1%), or all, of the soluble surfactant system is ion-sensitive. Further, soluble soap comprises less than 1% by weight of the bar, which helps produce a less alkaline pH bar while allowing squeaky feel to be produced.

Pearlescent detergent composition comprising a mixture of ethylene glycol alkylates (Arai, K., Kao Corp., April 8, 2008, US7354,891B2).

A process for preparing a cleansing composition having pearlescence, which contains adding an ingredient which has been molten beforehand, or an aqueous liquid in which the molten ingredient is contained, to a suspension of another ingredient and cooling the resultant mixture to cause the molten ingredient to deposit; and the cleansing composition. The process makes it possible to economically produce cleansing compositions that have pearlescence, excellent in the stability of their pearlants, and superb long-term storage stability under acidic conditions and high-temperature conditions.

Process for hydroxyalkylating carboxylic acid-functionalized materials (Woods, J., and others, Henkel Corp., April 8, 2008, US7354977B1).

The present invention relates to a process for hydroxyalkylating terminal carboxylic acid groups. More specifically, this invention provides a process for preparing hydroxyl-functionalized materials, such as butadiene nitrile polymers, from carboxylic acid-functionalized materials, such as butadiene nitrile polymers, using a carbocyclic carbonate, such as ethylene carbonate, or a carbocyclic sulfite, such as ethylene sulfite.

Protein lipase inhibitor for flour and dough (Pedersen, H., and others, Danisco A/S, April 8, 2008, US7355004B2).

The present invention relates to the isolation of and characterization of a novel lipase inhibitor and its effect on different lipases. The present invention also relates to the use of a lipase inhibitor as a screen for lipases. The present invention also relates to the use of the inhibitor and/or lipases identified by a lipase inhibitor in food and/or feed technologies.

Low suds laundry detergents with enhanced whiteness retention (Bastigkeit, T., and others, The Dial Corp., April 8, 2008, US7354892B2).

A unique laundry detergent composition is described that comprises linear alkyl benzene sulfonate, alkyl ether sulfate, alcohol ethoxylate, fatty acid, an alkali metal silicate, polyacrylate, and optionally carbonate, that is low sudsing and that shows improved whiteness retention over other fatty acid soap-containing detergents in the absence of silicates.

Compounds for treatment of lipase-mediated diseases (Upadhyay, S., and others, Reliance Life Sciences PVT LTD, April 8, 2008, US7355055B2).

Novel benzoquinone-derived compounds and polymorphs, prodrugs, geometric or optical isomers thereof, and pharmaceutically acceptable esters, ethers, carbamates, oximes of such compounds, polymorphs, prodrugs and isomers are provided. Process for preparation of compounds of the invention and pharmaceutical compositions containing such compounds and their use for reducing or inhibiting activity of lipase gene family for treatment, amelioration or prevention of lipase gene family mediated diseases and conditions including overweight, obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, pancreatitis, diabetes, atherosclerosis, other cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndromes, and metabolic disorders are provided. Methods of use of the compounds for skin care, hair care and cosmetics are provided.

Spreadable food product (Marangoni, A., and Idziak, S., Fractec Research & Development Inc., April 15, 2008, US7357957B2).

The present invention provides a novel cellular solid structure that can be used to structure an oil-water mixture into a semi-solid state. The invention is particularly useful in the manufacture of food products, drug delivery agents, coatings, barrier films, and encapsulating media.

Low-calorie low-fat butter-flavored topping compositions and methods of preparation (Buhler, A., and Hansen, A., Cumberland Packing Corp., May 6, 2008, US7368143B2).

A low-calorie low-fat butter-flavored topping composition and methods of preparation are disclosed. The topping composition exhibits overrun of between about 250–350% and has a fat content of less than about 16% and a water content of more than about 50%. In addition, the composition is preferably packaged in an aerosol container and stands up for at least 10 minutes at room temperature after being emitted from the aerosol container. Normal operation of the aerosol container allows removal of over 90% of the composition from the aerosol container.

Functionalized vegetable oil derivatives, latex compositions and coatings (Thames, S., and others, Southern Diversified Products, LLC, April 22, 2008, US7361710B2).

An ethylenically unsaturated vegetable oil is modified by the addition of an enophile or dienophile having an acid, ester, or anhydride functionality. The modified vegetable oil is then reacted with a functional vinyl monomer to form a vegetable oil derivative. The vegetable oil derivative is useful in forming latexes and coatings.

Process for producing polyunsaturated fatty acids by oleaginous yeasts (Chen, T.-C., Yeastern Biotech Co., Ltd., April 29, 2008, US7364883B2).

The present invention is directed to a process of producing novel fatty acids in oleaginous yeast by introducing into the yeast genes coding for enzymes selected from the group consisting of Δ5-desaturase, Δ6-desaturase, Δ12-desaturase, Δ15-desaturase and elongase; and culturing the yeast in the medium containing high levels of carbon sources. The present invention is further directed to a residue or fatty acid that is obtained from pressing the oleaginous yeast produced by the process of the invention.

Method for obtaining cocoa bean polyphenol extracts, resulting extracts, and uses thereof (Lecoupeau, J.-P., and Vercauteren, J., Barry Callebaut France, May 6, 2008, US7368144B2).

The invention concerns a method for obtaining extracts based on polyphenol compounds contained in cocoa, characterized in that it includes: using fresh beans, which have not been pre-treated or defatted, said fresh beans whereof their pulp and shell have been eliminated, so as to obtain clean almonds; grinding said almonds, in the presence of solvent(s); macerating the ground almonds in conditions enabling extraction of the desired compounds; filtering the macerated mixture; recuperating an extract containing said compounds from the filtrate. The invention also concerns the extracts and their uses for cosmetic, food, and therapeutic purposes.

Method for selective delivery of lipid-soluble antioxidants into the polar lipid fraction of a food product (Hultin, H., and others, University of Massachusetts, April 29, 2008, US7364763B1).

The invention relates to methods of reducing oxidation in foods by selectively adding one or more antioxidants to the polar lipid fraction of a food product.

Biodiesel additive and method of preparation thereof (Narayan, R., and others, Board of Trustees of Michigan State University, May 6, 2008, US7367995B2).

Fuel oxygenates comprised of fatty acid or fatty acid ester derivatives which have been reacted with ozone; a base; and a lower alkanol (1 to 8 carbon atoms) are described. The oxygenates comprise ester groups at a point of cleavage by the ozone which provide oxygen in the oxygenate.

Friction modifiers for improved anti-shudder performance and high static friction in transmission fluids (Adams, P., and others, The Lubrizol Corp., June 3, 2008, US7381-691B2).

A fluid composition of (i) a friction modifier derived from the reaction of a carboxylic acid or a reactive equivalent thereof with an aminoalcohol, the friction modifier containing at least two hydrocarbyl groups; and (ii) a dispersant other than a species of (i), provides good friction properties to an automatic transmission.

Bar soap with fibrous assembly (Grissett, G., and others, Unilever Home & Personal Care, USA Division of Conopco, Inc., June 3, 2008, US7381692B2).

A cleansing article composed of a solid or semisolid foamable composition and a batting layer with bonded fibers is described that provides the user with a pleasant personal cleansing experience and which in one embodiment combines cleansing, aesthetic, and/or skin benefit with active agents and exfoliation. The user also experiences substantial lather during use of the cleansing article. The batting layer is at least partially encompassed by the solid or semisolid foamable composition.

Deep-fry oil quality sensor (Liu, J., and others, Honeywell International Inc., June 10, 2008, US7383731B2).

A cooking oil quality sensing apparatus and system includes an acoustic wave sensor composed of one or more acoustic wave transducers configured upon a piezoelectric substrate such that when the acoustic wave sensor is in contact with cooking oil, the sensor generates acoustic wave data indicative of the quality of the cooking oil. An antenna can be integrated with the acoustic wave sensor, such that the antenna receives data from an external source and transmits the acoustic wave data indicative of the quality of the cooking oil to the external source. An oscillator can be integrated with the acoustic wave sensor, such that the output of the oscillator contains data indicative of the quality of the cooking oil. The acoustic wave sensor can be coated with a material that is selectively sensitive and/or reactive to one or more fatty acids associated with or contained in the cooking oil.

Complexed-acidic-phospholipid-collagen composites for bone induction (Boskey, A., and H. Tudor, New York Society for the Ruptured and Crippled Maintaining the Hospital for Special Surgery, June 10, 2008, US7384652B2).

The present invention provides a composition for osteoinduction, which comprises a complexed-acidic-phospholipid complex containing calcium, phospholipid, and inorganic phosphate combined with collagen in a composite form. The composition is effective to promote new bone formation upon introduction of the composition into various osseous defects.

Stearate composition and method (Heider, T., and others, Mallinckrodt Inc., June 10, 2008, US7385-068B2).

An improved alkaline earth metal stearate composition is disclosed and is prepared by reacting a fatty acid component including stearic acid and palmitic acid with an alkali hydroxide to form an alkaline soap. An aqueous metal salt solution is then added to the soap, and pH adjusted to less than about pH 8 to form the improved alkaline earth metal stearate. The improved alkaline earth metal stearate provides a substantially pure amount of the dihydrate form of the stearate.

Vegetable lipid-based composition and candle (Tao, B., Bose Mckinney & Evans LLP, June 17, 2008, US7387649B2).

A vegetable lipid-based composition comprised of a vegetable lipid component and a petroleum wax is described. The vegetable lipid component may include a triglyceride or a free fatty acid/triglyceride mixture. The vegetable lipid-based composition has properties that make it advantageous in candle production.

Biooxidation capabilities of Candida sp. (Eirich, L.D., et al., Cognis Corp., July 29, 2008, US7405063).

A bioprocess for producing carboxylic acids, alcohols, and aldehydes is provided by culturing Candida sp. in a fermentation medium containing various defined substrates.

Modification of solid 3-sn-phosphoglycerides (Yesair, D., et al., Biomolecular Products Inc., August 5, 2008, US7407779).

Methods for hydrolyzing solid ungranulated lysophosphatidylcholine with phospholipase A2 are provided. Also disclosed are methods for making a lipid matrix of lysophosphatidylcholine, monoglyceride and fatty acid, and lipid matrices of particular structure.

Method for the production of raw materials for candle production and a heat store material (Tischenborf, D., Inventor, August 19, 2008, US7413434).

The invention pertains to a method for the production of raw materials for candle production and for heat storage material, such as waxes, in which from a starting material containing lipids, the lipids are selectively extracted and/or refined and/or hydrogenated.

Protein product imparting high water dispersibility (Monagle, C., and Konwinski, A., Solae LLC, July 15, 2008, US7399495)

A method of imparting high water dispersibility to a protein product or protein-containing material, such as a powdered or particulate protein product, which method includes adding a surfactant and a flow-enhancing agent to the protein product. The method is applicable to vegetable protein products, such as soy protein, and is also applicable to non-vegetable protein products, such as casein. Additionally, the method is particularly useful for imparting high water dispersibility to protein products in which greater than about 80 wt% of the protein therein is water soluble protein.

Phospholipid derivative (Itoh, C., et al., Nof Corp., July 15, 2008, US7399877).

A phospholipid derivative having oxyethylene groups is provided which can thicken the water shell of liposome surface by suppressing the spreading of the polyalkylene oxide structure on the surface and thus increase stability of the liposome.

Nonaqueous ink composition for ink jet (Kitawaki, T., et al., Toshiba Tec Kabushiki Kaisha, July 1, 2008, US7393400).

Disclosed is a nonaqueous ink composition for ink jet, comprising a pigment, a dispersant, and a nonaqueous solvent. At least 50% by weight of the entire nonaqueous solvent is an ester series solvent having 24 to 36 carbon atoms.

Transesterification process of methyl acetate (Huang, H., et al., National Taiwan University, July 15, 2008, US7399881).

A transesterification process of methyl acetate is provided. The transesterification process provided in the present invention could highly reduce the investing production cost of the transesterification of the by-product, methyl acetate, in the conventional polyvinyl alcohol plants.

Opacifying composition for paper or paperboard, processes using same and paper or paperboard produced therefrom (Elgarhy, Y., et al., Tri Tex Co. Inc., August 19, 2008, US7413631).

An agent for enhancing brightness and opaqueness in paperboard comprises a reaction product selected from the groups consisting of: (i) an amide reaction product of a C12–C22 fatty acid, condensed with an amine selected from monoalkanol amines, dialkanol amines or diethylene triamine or a mixture thereof; (ii) an amide reaction product of a triglyceride of a C12–C22 fatty acid condensed with an amine selected from monoalkanol amine, dialkanol amine, or diethylene triamine or a mixture thereof; (iii) an amide reaction product of an ester of a C12–C22 fatty acid condensed with an amine selected from monoalkanol lower alkyl amine, dialkanol amine, diethylene triamine or a mixture thereof; and (iv) an ester reaction of a C12–C22 fatty acid condensed with an alcohol selected from glycerine, ethylene glycol or propylene glycol.

Adhesives from modified soy protein (Sun, S., et al., Kansas State University, August 26, 2008, US7416598).

The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF (urea formaldehyde) and phenol formaldehyde resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

Conjugated linolenic acids and methods of preparation and purification and uses thereof (Galvez, J., et al., Universite Laval, August 26, 2008, US7417159).

This invention relates to a new conjugated linoleic acids, a process for preparation thereof, and method of use. Thus, this invention is concerned with the preparation and purification of conjugated linoleic acids from materials rich in α- or γ-linoleic acids.

Process for the recovery of a phytolipid composition (Zima, G., et al., Eastman Chem. Co., August 26, 2008, US7416756).

Disclosed is a process for the recovery of a phytolipid composition from a vegetable oil by-product. The phytolipid composition produced comprises squalene, phytosterols, mixed tocopherols and tocotrieneols, and vegetable wax and is useful as an emollient. It may be formulated in cosmetic compositions such as creams, lotions, gels, ointments, lip balms, sticks, or pencils for treatment of the skin and lips. The phytolipid composition also may be incorporated into foods, beverages, and nutraceuticals to provide health benefits.

 

Patent Applications

 

Process for converting triglycerides to hydrocarbons (Yao, J., and others, ConocoPhillips Co., Bartlesville, Oklahoma, USA, August 2, 2007, US20070175795A1).

Processes for the conversion of hydrocarbons boiling in the temperature range of from about 80°F (29°C) to about 1000°F (538°C) to diesel boiling range hydrocarbons, and processes for increasing the cetane number and amount of n-C17 hydrocarbon products in such processes. Diesel boiling-range hydrocarbons may be produced by contacting a hydrocarbon boiling in the above-mentioned boiling range with a triglyceride-containing compound to form a mixture, and then contacting the mixture with a hydrotreating catalyst under suitable reaction conditions.

Low trans-fatty acid fats and fat compositions and methods of making same (Van Toor, H., and others, Cargill Inc., Wayzata, Minnesota, USA, August 9, 2007, US20070185340A1).

This disclosure describes select low trans-fatty acid fats and fat compositions and methods of making such fats and fat compositions. These fats and fat compositions achieve properties commonly associated with typical partially hydrogenated fats, but avoid the high trans-fatty acid contents typically associated with such fats.

Frying fats and oils (Cain, F.W., and others, Loders Croklaan USA LLC, Channahon, Illinois, USA, September 6, 2007, US20070207250A1).

Compositions suitable for use as a frying fat or oil may be derived from palm oil by a process comprising interesterification and comprise triglycerides. The compositions may have a content of saturated fatty acids having from 12 to 24 carbon atoms (SAFA) of at least 53% by weight, and a content of unsaturated fatty acids having 18 carbon atoms of less than 47% by weight. The compositions may be used to prepare fried foods such as donuts.

Hydrogenated castor oil based compositions as a replacement for petrolatum (Swaile, D., and Modafari, B., The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, September 27, 2007, US20070224142A1).

An aqueous deodorant composition comprising (i) from about 0.1% to about 89.9% by weight of a hydrogenated castor oil-based composition comprising a first oil, said first oil comprising hydrogenated castor oil, and a second oil to soften the hydrogenated castor oil; (ii) from about 0.1% to about 30% by weight of a thickening or structuring agent; and (iii) from about 10% to about 75% by weight of water.

trans-Fat free plastic composition for bakery products (Yu, W., and Jackson, R., Hovey Williams LLP, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, October 18, 2007, US20070243308A1).

A stable trans fat free emulsifier composition is provided that may have other functional ingredients incorporated to form a base for a flour-based dough preparation to hold the ingredients together. A glyceride emulsifier is heated above its melting point and blended with a nonhydrogenated vegetable oil, or a quantity of glyceride emulsifier is blended with nonhydrogenated vegetable oil and the mixture then heated to a temperature above its melting point. The ratio of emulsifier to vegetable oil is selected to cause the composition, on cooling, to form a solid plastic mass. The hardness value of the plastic mass is within a range especially applicable to bakery dough applications.

Process for production of biodiesel from high-acid feed (Aiken, J., Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 15, 2007, USAUS20070261294A1).

Biodiesel fuels are produced efficiently and at low cost from waste oil feeds containing high concentrations of fatty acids. By first producing an ester of a water-immiscible alcohol, water of reaction from the esterification can be easily stripped out with and separated from the alcohol, which is recycled to the esterification reaction. Subsequent transesterification with glycerin produces a feed with a sufficiently low acid value to allow methanolysis using a basic catalyst to proceed rapidly without consumption of large quantities of catalyst or organic acid salt formation.

Method for producing a purified lipase (Negishi, S., and others, Nisshin OilliO Group Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, November 15, 2007, US20070264695A1).

The present invention provides a method for producing a purified lipase, which comprises steps of: (i) bringing a long-chain fatty acid triglyceride and a medium-chain triglyceride into contact with a lipase to purify the lipase; and (ii) collecting the purified lipase. According to this production method, the purified lipase can be obtained wherein content of impurity such as silicon is decreased.

Method for making industrial chemicals (Millis, J., and others, Cargill Inc., Wayzata, Minnesota, USA, November 22, 2007, US20070270621A1).

A process for producing industrially important chemicals from renewable resources is disclosed. This “biobased” process uses readily available, renewable resources comprising fatty acids rather than exploiting fossil sources, such as coal and petroleum. In one embodiment of the process 1-octene, along with methyl-9-decenoate and butadiene, is produced from linoleic acid via an enzyme-mediated isomerization reaction, followed by a metathesis reaction with ethylene. Linoleic acid can be isolated from vegetable oils, such as soybean oil.

Soy-based polyols (Suppes, G., and others, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA, November 15, 2007, US20070265459A1).

The invention provides processes for converting a vegetable oil to a polymer. In particular, the processing steps comprise bodying, epoxidation, hydrolysis, and oligomerization. These processes provide new processing paths for the formation of polyols for use in rigid foam and other applications.

Novel bioactive lipid derivatives, and methods of making and using same (Sabbadini, R., and others, Biotechnology Law Group; c/o PortfolioIP, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, December 6, 2007, US20070281320A1).

Compositions and methods for producing monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives reactive against bioactive lipid targets are described. These compositions include derivatized lipids, each of which comprises a bioactive lipid having a polar head group and at least one hydrocarbon chain (e.g., a lysolipid such as lysophosphatidic acid or sphingosine-1-phosphate) in which a carbon atom has been derivatized with a pendant reactive group; immunogens made by linking a derivatized lipid to a carrier moiety (e.g., a carrier protein, polyethylene glycol, colloidal gold, alginate, or a silicone bead); monoclonal antibodies and derivatives produced by immunizing an animal with such an immunogen; and therapeutic and diagnostic compositions containing such antibodies and antibody derivatives. Methods for making such derivatized lipids, immunogens, and monoclonal antibodies and derivatives, methods for detecting such antibodies once generated, and therapeutic and diagnostic methods for using such antibodies and derivatives are also described.

Structured triglycerides and emulsions comprising same (Rozen, G., and Shochat, I., c/o Winston & Strawn LLP, Washington, DC, USA, December 6, 2007, US20070281993A1).

The present invention relates to structured triglycerides, to parenteral nutrition emulsions comprising same, and use thereof. In particular, the invention relates to structured triglycerides comprising at least one medium-chain C6–C12 fatty acid and at least one fatty acid selected from the group consisting of long-chain C14–C18 or very-long-chain C20–C22 fatty acids, preferably each fatty acid is present in a predetermined position of the glycerol backbone. The parenteral nutrition emulsions are particularly useful for nourishing preterm- and term-infants, children, critically ill patients, and cancer patients.

Process for decarboxylation of fatty acids and oils to produce paraffins or olefins (Scheibel, J., and Reilman, R., The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, December 6, 2007, US20070281875A1).

The invention is directed to a process of decarboxylation of natural fats and oils comprising the use of an activated acidic catalyst essentially free of Group VIII metals. Embodiments of the present process comprise the steps of supplying a feedstock comprising natural fats, oils, and mixtures thereof to a reaction vessel, subjecting the feedstock to an activated acidic catalyst essentially free of Group VIII metals, purging the reaction vessel with an inert gas, and subjecting the feedstock and catalyst to a temperature of from about 250 to about 500°C.

Enzymatic method of making aldehydes from fatty acids (Binder, T., Archer Daniels Midland Co., Decatur, Illinois, USA, December 6, 2007, US20070281345A1).

The present invention provides methods of enzymatically preparing aldehydes from fatty acids by utilizing a carboxylic acid reductase enzyme to reduce the fatty acids to their corresponding aldehydes. The present invention also provides aldehydes prepared by the methods of the invention.

Method of preparing enhanced reactive vegetable oils (Newbold, T., and Casper, D., McKellar IP Law, PLLC, Midland, Michigan, USA, December 6, 2007, US20070282117A1).

A method of preparing enhanced reactive vegetable oils wherein the method comprises providing a hydroxy functional vegetable oil having a predetermined hydroxyl value and, under nitrogen, treating the hydroxyl functional vegetable oil with a catalyst using heat and pressure. Any water that is formed is removed. The mixture is heated under pressure and then an alkylene oxide is added while heating under pressure. In one embodiment, thereafter, there is added ethylene oxide and the material is heated and then the material is neutralized with acid. This process results in a primary hydroxyl functional vegetable oil polyol that is an enhanced reactive vegetable oil.

Ophthalmic compositions comprising a branched, glycerol monoalkyl compound and a fatty acid monoester (Burke, S., and others, Bausch & Lomb Inc., Rochester, New York, USA, December 13, 2007, US20070286767A1).

An aqueous ophthalmic composition comprising a branched, glycerol monoalkyl compound and a fatty acid monoester. The fatty acid monoester comprises an aliphatic fatty acid portion having 6 to 14 carbon atoms and an aliphatic hydroxyl portion. The composition will also have an osmolality in a range from 200 mOsm/kg to 400 mOsm/kg. The invention is also directed to a method of inhibiting the formation of foam in an aqueous ophthalmic composition that includes a surfactant as well as to a method of enhancing the biocidal efficacy of an aqueous ophthalmic composition containing a fatty acid monoester.

Fat composition (Herzing, A., and others, Loders Croklaan USA LLC, Channahon, Illinois, USA, December 13, 2007, US20070286940A1).

A vegetable fat composition comprises glycerides, wherein the triglyceride content of the composition is: 6 to 20% SSS, 5 to less than 20% SUS, 5 to less than 25% SSU, 10 to 39% SU2 and at least 20% U3, wherein S is a saturated fatty acid residue having 16 to 24 carbon atoms and U is an unsaturated fatty acid residue having at least 18 carbon atoms and all percentages are by weight based on the total triglycerides present in the composition, the weight ratio SUS/SSU is between 0.5 and 2.0, the weight ratio of (saturated fatty acid residues having 18 to 24 carbon atoms)/(saturated fatty acid residues having 16 carbon atoms) in the total S content of the triglycerides is less than 0.2, and the triglycerides contain less than 3% of arachidic and behenic acid residues based on the total fatty acid residue content of the triglycerides, and wherein the saturated fatty acid residue content of the triglycerides is less than 45% by weight of the total fatty acid residues in the triglycerides. The composition may be used to produce baked products and iced confectionery products.

Binder and building material modified with vegetable oils and derivatives thereof (Weirich, H., c/o K.F. Ross P.C., Bronx, New York, USA, December 13, 2007, US20070287820A1).

The invention relates to a binder or building material on the basis of a synthetic material, such as polystyrene in the form of a monopolymerisate or copolymerisate, or an inorganic polymer, which is available as an absorptive compound, and at least one vegetable oil, vegetable oil constituent, or vegetable oil derivative. The binder or building material can be prepared by reacting the synthetic material or the inorganic polymer as small particles with vegetable oil. The binder or building material can be used as an adhesive or sealant and as an additive to building materials, to manufacture an essentially homogeneous granulate of high flowability and bulk density, as a constituent of detergents and cleaning agents, and as a precursor or intermediate product for cosmetics and body-care products.

Processes for converting glycerol to amino alcohols (Arredondo, V., and others, The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, December 13, 2007, US20070287868A1).

Processes for converting glycerol to an amino alcohol product involving reacting glycerol with a metal catalyst to obtain hydroxyacetone, and reacting the hydroxyacetone with an amine compound to obtain an adduct that is then reduced using a reducing agent to obtain an amino alcohol product are described.

Lipoxygenase (Sugio, A., and Takagi, S., Novozymes A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark, December 20, 2007, US20070292581A1).

A novel fungal lipoxygenase from Manaporthe salvinii and its sequence are described. Lipoxygenase has been cloned into E. coli. Oligonucleotide probes based on the sequence information are useful for screening a eukaryotic library to obtain a lipoxygenase. The lipoxygenase is useful in baking and in a detergent.

Desaturase enzymes (Graham, I., and Tonon, T., c/o Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC, Washington DC, USA, December 20, 2007, US20070294790A1).

Novel transgenic cells comprising a polynucleotide molecule encoding a polypeptides having Thalassiosira pseudonana desaturase activity, or polynucleotide molecules. Also provided are transgenic plants, seeds of said plants and reaction vessels comprising the transgenic cells. Methods for desaturating fatty acid substrates are also provided.

Mixture composition containing unsaturated carboxylic acid and alkene ether derivative-based copolymers and copolymers and terpolymers containing sulfo groups and use thereof (Maier, M., and others, c/o Fulbright & Jaworski, LLP, New York, New York, USA, December 13, 2007, US20070287817A1).

The invention relates to a mixture with dispersing properties. Copolymers based on unsaturated mono- or dicarboxylic acid derivatives and oxyalkylene ethers comprise component I, and water-soluble copolymers and terpolymers containing sulfo groups having an average molecular weight of 50,000–20,000,000 g/mol comprise component II. These are combined for use as dispersing agents for organic and/or inorganic pigments and fillers. In the field of structural chemistry, the mixture compositions are suitable for use on account of the dispersing properties thereof, particularly in ceramic systems and in water-based painting and coating systems. The mixtures are also solvents, and they can be used more particularly as casein substitutes in self-leveling gap-filling materials and troweling compounds.

Lubricant combinations (Daute, P., Cognis Corp., Ambler, Pennsylvania, USA, December 27, 2007, US20070298986A1).

A lubricant composition for thermoplastic processing including at least one natural fat and/or oil with an iodine value below 10 and at least one lubricant different from the natural fat and/or oil is provided.

Concentrated and odorless omega-3 fatty acids (Miller, L., and others, The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, December 27, 2007, US20070299134A1).

Fatty acid esters are distilled to enrich PUFA, and triacylglycerols enriched in PUFA are prepared. The triglyceride mixture may optionally be treated by water washing, bleaching, evaporation, steam stripping, and mixtures of these, to remove residual free fatty acids, aldehydes, color bodies, odor bodies, peroxides, and esters. Triethylamine levels are reduced to less than about 50 parts per billion, to yield substantially odor-free triacylglycerols enriched in PUFA.

Process for separating saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (Wanasundara, U., POS Pilot Plant Corp., Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada, December 27, 2007, US20070299272A1).

Fractionation of free fatty acids is carried out by complexing the free fatty acids with urea and separating the urea complexed free fatty acids into a first fraction enriched with saturated free fatty acids and a second fraction enriched with unsaturated free fatty acids.

Transesterification catalyst mixing system (Wiedemann, R., and others, c/o Ian F. Burns & Associates, Reno, Nevada, USA, January 3, 2008, US20080004458A1).

A transesterification reaction system having a catalyst dissolution chamber, a catalyst-triglyceride mixing chamber, a holding chamber and a fluid transfer device for circulating the triglyceride component, is disclosed. The catalyst dissolution chamber includes a turbulating device for wetting solid catalyst with an alcohol component and the catalyst-triglyceride mixing chamber includes a turbulent flow suction device. A transesterification method using the reaction system described above is also disclosed.

Handling and blending of biodiesel (Sell, A., and others, Marathon Petroleum Co. LLC, Findlay, Ohio, USA, January 10, 2008, US20080005957A1).

This handling relates to the effective storage and blending of biodiesel with petroleum fuel. More specifically, the processing relates to blending biodiesel with petroleum-based diesel fuel stocks in cold weather without shock crystallization.

Fatty acid pharmaceutical foam (Abram, A., and Goldstein, I., Stiefel Res Austrialia Pty Ltd., Rowville, Australia, January 17, 2008, US20080015271A1).

The present invention provides a foamable composition comprising water and a fatty acid. The composition may further comprise a pharmaceutically active agent. The composition of the invention is also useful for the treatment of dermatological disorders by the topical administration of the composition.

Stabilized ester compositions and their use in film-forming compositions (Bloom, P., and others, Archer Daniels Midland Co., Decatur, Illinois USA, January 17, 2008, US20080015296A1).

This invention relates to a composition of a stabilized furfural or glycol ester of a vegetable oil fatty acid and an antioxidant such as butylated hydroxy toluene and to latex film-forming compositions containing stabilized furfural or glycol esters, such as a stabilized propylene glycol monoester (PGME) mixture.

Process for the conversion of a crude glycerol, crude mixtures of naturally derived multicomponent aliphatic hydrocarbons or esters thereof to a chlorohydrin (Hook, B., and others, The Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Michigan, USA, January 17, 2008, US20080015370A1).

A process for converting a crude glycerol from a renewable raw material to a chlorohydrin, by contacting the crude glycerol with a source of a high-pressure HCl without removing water in high yield without substantial formation of undesired overchlorinated by-products. Chlorohydrins made by the process of the present invention are useful in preparing epoxides such as epichlorohydrins.

Producing method of phospholipids including long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids as constituents, and use of such phospholipids (Kawashima, H., and others, c/o Drinker Biddle & Reath, Washington DC, USA, January 24, 2008, US20080020124A1).

The present invention provides a method of efficiently and stably producing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid phospholipids (LCPUFA-PL). Specifically, the invention provides a method for producing phospholipids that contain LCPUFA as a constituent, wherein lipid-producing cells producing lipids that contain LCPUFA are used as a starting material, the method including a PL extracting step of extracting PL from defatted cells obtained by extracting triglyceride-containing oil or fat from the lipid-producing cells.

Method to apply membrane lipids to a substrate (Lenhert, S., and Fuchs, H., Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe, Germany, January 24 2008, US20080020141A1).

A method for applying membrane lipids to a substrate includes providing a substrate and an ink reservoir having an ink including a membrane lipid. The tip of a scanning probe microscope is dipped into the ink so as to dispose the membrane lipid on the tip. The tip of the scanning probe microscope is brought into contact with a surface of the substrate. The tip is moved over regions of the surface so that the membrane lipid migrates from the tip of the scanning probe microscope onto the surface of the substrate in the regions and the membrane lipid organizes itself in the regions in a form of a single lipid layer or in a form of one or a plurality of mutually superposed lipid bilayers. The tip is removed from the surface of the substrate.

Devices and methods for separating phospholipids from biological samples (Bennett, P., and van Horne, K., c/o Thorpe North & Western, LLP, Sandy, Utah, USA, January 24, 2008, US20080020485A1).

Device and methods for the removal of phospholipids from biological samples are disclosed and described. Removal of phospholipids may be desirable for the analysis of the phospholipids themselves, or to prevent the phospholipids from conflicting with and effectively masking other analytes in the sample for which identification or quantification is sought.

Body taste improver comprising long-chain unsaturated fatty acid and/or ester (Yamaguchi, S., and others, c/o Birch Stewart Kolasch & Birch, January 31, 2008, US20080026128A1).

A food taste improver based on a long-chain highly unsaturated fatty acid and/or an ester thereof as a main component and a body taste-increasing component; a body taste improver comprising a long-chain highly unsaturated fatty acid and/or an ester thereof derived from a particular vegetable oil high in γ-linolenic acid.

Indulgent edible composition (Bellody, W., and others, Mars, Inc., January 31, 2008, US20080026111A1).

The present invention is directed to an indulgent edible composition that provides an orally pleasurable eating experience similar to chocolate as the chocolate melts in the mouth. Starch is combined with a protein-containing component that will substantially hydrate in water and will not coagulate, a soluble sweetener, a fat component that melts at a temperature of about 45°C or less, a hydrocolloid gelling agent that facilitates the formation of a gel matrix that will break down at a temperature of about 45°C or less, and an edible surfactant with an HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) value of about 0 to about 12, wherein the edible composition has a total moisture content from about 10% to about 50% moisture by weight of the composition.

Process for producing glycerol having low aldehyde and ketone content and improved storage stability (Schoerken, U., and others, Cognis Corp., February 7, 2008, US20080033191A).

Crude glycerol from a fat or oil is treated with a reducing agent to produce a medicament or pharmaceutical composition by combining glycerol and at least one pharmaceutically active ingredient. The compositions form very little glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone during storage.

Composition for lipase activity determination and method of determing activity (Imamura, S., Asahi Kasei Pharma Corp., February 14, 2008, US20080038765A1).

Lipase activity is determined with diacylglycerol lipase substrate dissolved in a buffer. A monoglyceride lipase in the kit converts monoglycerides yielded by hydrolysis into glycerol. Glycerol kinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, reduced NAD, ATP, and phosphoenol pyruvate react with the glycerol to form a colored product.

Solventless extraction process (Ruecker, C., and others, Martek Biosciences Corp., February 14, 2008, US20080038800A1).

A method for extracting lipids from microorganisms without using organic solvent as an extraction solvent is presented. The method involves lysing cells and removing water-soluble materials by washing the lysed cell mixtures with aqueous washing solutions until a substantially nonemulsified lipid is obtained.

Branched biodiesels (Zhang, Z., Akzo Nobel Inc., February 21, 2008, US20080045731A1).

The present invention relates to a process for branching fatty acids or alkyl esters thereof and the use of such branched fatty acid alkyl esters as a major component of biodiesel.

Isocyanate composition comprising a vegetable oil and composites therefrom (Hazell, D., The Dow Chemical Co., February 21, 2008, US20080044661A1).

The present invention relates to an isocyanate composition comprising vegetable oil and use of the said composition as a moisture-curable binder when preparing molded composite articles from particulate material. An isocyanate composition containing a methylene diphenylisocyanate prepolymer and soybean oil are reacted and used as a binder for formation of rubber crumb composites.

Novel lipid mixtures for synthetic surfactants (Johansson, J., and others, Chiesi Farmaceutici S.p.A., February 21, 2008, US20080045449A1).

The present invention provides novel lipid mixtures for synthetic surfactants. In particular, the invention provides a specific lipid mixture containing a specific amount of polyunsaturated phospholipids to be used for the preparation of synthetic surfactants. Said surfactants and pharmaceutical compositions thereof are useful for the treatment of surfactant deficiencies such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS).

Production and use of monoglycerides (Schoerken, U., and others, Cognis Corp., February 21, 2008, US20080045606A1).

A higher-yielding process for the production of monoglycerides in which triglycerides are enzymatically reacted with a catalytic amount of a lipase that has been activated by the addition of alkaline salts, in the presence of linear or branched alcohols containing 1 to 8 carbon atoms. The monoglycerides thus produced are useful in lubricants, fuel additives, and emulsifying constituents in foods, and cosmetic and/or pharmaceutical formulations.

Lipid preparation for enhancing mineral absorption (Shulman, A., and others, c/o Fleit Kain Gibbons Gutman Bongini & Bianco, March 6, 2008, US20080058415A1).

A dietary triacylglycerol that enhances mineral absorption and intake with high levels of mono- or polyunsaturated fatty acids at positions sn-1 and sn-3 of the glycerol backbone is combined with plant-derived oil, such as flax and canola oils, medium-chain triglycerides and an oil mimicking the triglyceride composition of human mother’s milk fat. The dietary ingredient is particularly intended for use in enhancing calcium absorption and in the prevention and/or treatment of disorders associated with depletion of bone calcium and bone density, prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, for the enhancement of bone formation and bone mass maximization, and for the enhancement of bone formation in infants and young children.

Spreadable food product (Marangoni, A., and Idziak, S., Fractec Research & Development Inc., April 15, 2008, US7357957B2).

The present invention provides a novel cellular solid structure that can be used to structure an oil-water mixture into a semi-solid state. The invention is particularly useful in the manufacture of food products, drug delivery agents, coatings, barrier films, and encapsulating media.

Stabilizing vegetable oils and methods of making same Modifying unsaturated triglycerides using lactone or ketones; lubricants; metal working fluids; hydraulic or dielectric fluids (Higgins, N., and Stults, J., Bunge Oils Inc., February 21, 2008, US20080045733A1).

A method for modifying ethylenic unsaturation in a triglyceride. One or more unsaturated fatty acyl moieties present in the triglyceride are substituted with a lactone or ketone moiety via an electron donor-mediated reaction. The resulting reaction products are useful, for example, as formulations for lubricants, hydraulic fluids, dielectric fluids, and intermediates for polymer synthesis.

Process for the alternating conversion of glycerol to propylene glycol or amino alcohols (Arredondo, V., and others, Procter & Gamble, February 21, 2008, US20080045749A1).

Industrial processes for the alternating conversion of glycerol to either an amino alcohol product or propylene glycol are disclosed. Glycerol is converted to hydroxyacetone, which may then be directly reduced to obtain propylene glycol or optionally reacted with an amine compound to produce an adduct that may be reduced to obtain an amino alcohol product.

Processes for producing fats or oils and compositions comprising the fats or oils (Lee, I., and Wicklund, L., Archer Daniels Midland Co., March 6, 2008, US20080057552A1).

Fats and oils subjected to modification by enzyme catalysts are pretreated with a granular clay, a combination of granular clay and protein, or a combination of granular clay and granular carbon resulting in improved productivity of the enzyme catalysts when used to modify the fats and oils.

Esterified catechins, processes for producing the same, and foods and beverages as well as cosmetics containing such esterified catechins (Fukami, H., and others, c/o Drinker Biddle & Reath, March 6, 2008, US20080058409A1).

A medium-chain fatty acid ester of a catechin shows a strong growth-suppressing effect on heat-resistant spore-forming bacteria and is useful in foods, beverages, and cosmetics.

Zero-trans fat shortening for laminated dough applications (Cottrell, T., and Dantuma, P., Kerry Group, March 13, 2008, US2008-0063782A1).

The present invention provides a shortening composition free of trans fatty acids and comprises at least one partially acetylated monoglyceride, at least one fully acetylated monoglyceride, at least one mixed mono-diglyceride, and at least one vegetable oil. The shortening composition of the present invention optionally comprises at least one vegetable hard stock and optionally comprises one or more antioxidants. Further, in some embodiments the shortening composition is anhydrous. The zero trans fat shortening composition of the present invention is characterized by excellent plasticity and elasticity, and is useful for the preparation of fine baking goods.

Cataylst extrudates based on copper oxide and their use for hydrogenating carbonyl compounds (Schlitter, S., and others, BASF Aktiengesellschaft, March 13, 2008, US20080064883A1).

Catalyst in the form of an extrudate which comprises from 5 to 85% by weight of copper oxide and in which the same oxidic support material is present in the active composition and as binder, and the use of the catalyst for the hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds.

Method of converting triglycerides to biofuels (Li, L., Applied Research Associates, Inc., March 20, 2008, US2008-0071125A1).

A triglyceride-to-fuel conversion process including the steps of (i) preconditioning unsaturated triglycerides by catalytic conjugation, cyclization, and cross-link steps; (ii) contacting the modified triglycerides with hot-compressed water containing a catalyst, wherein cracking, hydrolysis, decarboxylation, dehydration, aromatization, or isomerization, or any combination thereof, of the modified triglycerides produces a crude hydrocarbon oil and an aqueous phase containing glycerol and lower molecular weight molecules, and (iii) refining the crude hydrocarbon oil to produce various grades of biofuels. A triglyceride-to-fuel conversion process further including the steps of (i) carrying out anaerobic fermentation and decarboxylation/dehydration, wherein the anaerobic fermentation produces hydrogen, volatile acids, and alcohols from fermentable feedstocks, and the decarboxylation/dehydration produces alkenes from the volatile acids and alcohols, respectively; (ii) feeding the alkenes to the cyclization process; (iii) feeding the hydrogen to the post-refining process; and (iv) recycling the aqueous phase containing glycerol to the decarboxylation/dehydration process. A biofuel composition including straight-chain, branched and cyclo paraffins, and aromatics. The paraffins are derived from conversion of triglycerides. The aromatics are derived from conversion of either triglycerides, petroleum, or coal.

Method for producing polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic organisms (Cirpus, P., and others, BASF Plant Science GmbH, March 27, 2008, US20080076166A1).

The present invention relates to a process for the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids in an organism by introducing, into the organism, nucleic acids which encode polypeptides with Δ5-elongase, Δ6-desaturase, Δ5-desaturase, Δ4-desaturase, Δ12-desaturase, and/or Δ6-elongase activity. These desaturases and elongases are advantageously derived from Ostreococcus. The invention furthermore relates to a process for the production of oils and/or triacylglycerides with an elevated content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The invention furthermore relates to the nucleic acid sequences, nucleic acid constructs, vectors and organisms comprising the nucleic acid sequences according to the invention, to vectors comprising the nucleic acid sequences and/or the nucleic acid constructs, and to transgenic organisms comprising the abovementioned nucleic acid sequences, nucleic acid constructs and/or vectors. A further part of the invention relates to oils, lipids, and/or fatty acids produced by the process according to the invention and to their use. Moreover, the invention relates to unsaturated fatty acids and to triglycerides with an elevated content of unsaturated fatty acids and to their use.

Lipolytic enzyme assay (Bjornvad, M., and Gernot, A., Novozymes North America, Inc., March 27, 2008, US20080076675A1).

The present invention relates to a method for measuring the activity of a lipolytic enzyme comprising measuring the pH of the gas phase of the enzymatic reaction between the lipolytic enzyme and a substrate, wherein the substrate comprises an ester bond between a C1–C10 carboxylic acid and an alcohol. Furthermore, it relates to a method for screening a library of polypeptides for a lipolytic enzyme of interest comprising testing the library in said method.

Zero trans fat baking margarine with specific solid fat index range (Syed, A., Suiter Swantz PC LLO, April 3, 2008, US20080081101A1).

The present invention is a margarine product. The margarine product includes an aqueous component, in a proportion of at the most 20% by weight of the margarine product, the aqueous component being emulsified in the fat. The margarine product further includes a first oil; and a second oil, wherein the first oil is interesterified and blended with the second oil to allow the margarine product to be suitable for baking, the margarine product having a solid fat index range of 28 ± 5 @ 50°F, 20 ± 5 @ 70°F, 13 ± 4 @ 80°F, 4 ± 2 @ 92°F, and 3 max @ 102°F as defined by analytical method reference.

Aqueous phospholipid-containing anti-frizz composition for hair (Nguyen, N., and others, L’OREAL, April 10, 2008, US20080085254A1).

The present invention is drawn to a composition and process for inhibiting hair from becoming frizzy when exposed to high and/or low humidity, the composition containing: (i) at least one phospholipid; (ii) at least one nonionic surfactant; (iii) at least one anionic silicone; (iv) at least one water-insoluble material; (v) at least one cationic polymer; and (vi) at least one film former, different from (v).

Microemulsion of polar antioxidants in edible oils (Miquel, Fernando, and Galdon, Natraceutical Industrial S.L.U., April 10, 2008, US20080085357A1).

The basis of this invention consists of the formation of microemulsions from a polar antioxidant-rich fraction in an oily medium, specifically in edible oils. These microemulsions are characterized in that their stability and homogeneity make them suitable for incorporation into different foods or pharmaceutical products. The most novel factor of this invention is that the critical micellar concentration (CMC) is attained by vacuum elimination of the excess polar solvent, which is the antioxidant matrix, leaving part of this solvent in the microemulsion, acting as co-surfactant.

Rapid fatty acid assay for use in pulp pitch control (Jiang, C., and others, Enzymatic Deinking Technologies, LLC, April 3, 2008, US20080078519A1).

Methods are provided for determining the surface fatty acid content in a wood pulp or whitewater sample. The methods comprise reacting free fatty acids that are present on the surface of the wood pulp fibers in the sample or in the whitewater with one or more reagents to form a measurable species, and determining the fatty acid content from the quantitative measurement of the measurable species. The method is useful as a quick, portable, accurate, and low-cost assay for assessing the fatty acid content present at various sample points in pulp and paper mills. The method for determining the free fatty acid content can be conducted in a batch process (e.g., where samples are collected periodically and the test is conducted offline). Alternatively, the method for determining the free fatty acid content can be conducted in a continuous or semicontinuous process (e.g., online sampling/analysis).

Novel natural oil gels and their applications (Lin, S., Applechem, Inc., April 10, 2008, US20080085961A1)

The invention is an article of manufacture, comprising a blend of: (i) from 1 to 50 wt% of at least one block copolymer, wherein the block copolymer has at least one polystyrene block and at least one unsaturated rubber segment; and (ii) from 99 to 50 wt% of a natural oil. The natural oil of this invention is of natural animal, plant, or vegetable oils or mixtures thereof, and the block copolymers have a polystyrene block and a rubber block where the rubber blocks are unsaturated rubbers such as polyisoprene, polybutadiene, or mixtures thereof. The block copolymers useful for the present invention are triblock polymers, radial (star) polymers, multiblock polymers, diblock polymers, or mixtures thereof.

Hydrogenation process and high monoene compositions obtained therefrom (Sleeter, R., Archer Daniels Midland Co., April 17, 2008, US2008-0091039A1).

A hydrogenation process for producing high monoene compositions is disclosed. In particular, a catalyst comprising basic copper carbonate is used for the selective hydrogenation of oils that contain unsaturated fatty acyl components such as unsaturated vegetable oils. Hydrogenation according to the methods of the invention yields high-monoene compositions that are useful for industrial applications, such as lubricants.

Biodegradable soy protein-based compositions and composites formed therefrom (Netravali, A., and others, Jaeckle Fleischmann & Mugel, LLP, April 17, 2008, US20080090939A1).

A biodegradable polymeric composition includes 99.5 wt% to 40 wt% soy protein and 0.5 wt% to 60 wt% of a first strengthening agent that consists essentially of a polysaccharide selected from the group consisting of agar, gellan, and mixtures thereof. The composition is substantially completely soluble in water at a pH of about 7.0 or higher. A biodegradable composite includes a fiber mat and the described biodegradable polymeric composition. A biodegradable molded thermoset solid article is obtained by subjecting the described biodegradable polymeric composition to conditions of temperature and pressure effective to form the thermoset solid article.

Method for cold stable biojet fuel (Seames, W., and T. Aulich, University of North Dakota, April 24, 2008, US20080092436A1).

Plant or animal oils are processed to produce a fuel that operates at very cold temperatures and is suitable as an aviation turbine fuel, a diesel fuel, a fuel blendstock, or any fuel having a low cloud point, pour point, or freeze point. The process is based on the cracking of plant or animal oils or their associated esters, known as biodiesel, to generate lighter chemical compounds that have substantially lower cloud, pour, and/or freeze points than the original oil or biodiesel. Cracked oil is processed using separation steps together with analysis to collect fractions with desired low temperature properties by removing undesirable compounds that do not possess the desired temperature properties.

Novel vegetable protein fractionation process and compositions (Deak, N., and L. Johnson, Iowa State University Research Foundation, Inc., April 24, 2008, US20080095914A1).

According to the invention a novel vegetable protein fractionation procedure is disclosed which includes a straightforward process to obtain 7S-rich (β-conglycinin-rich) and 11S-rich (glycinin-rich) isolated protein fractions with unique functional and nutritional properties desired by the food industry. The process is much simplified compared with the art and avoids multiple steps in the usual fractionation of soy protein and uses very small amounts of salts avoiding the necessity of excessive washing and desalting steps. The process yields high amounts of protein fractions with high isoflavone contents and improved functional properties.

Soy protein isolate and process for its manufacture (Cho, M., and others, Solae, LLC, April 24, 2008, US20080096243A1).

A soy protein isolate and method for preparing the same are disclosed. The novel soy protein isolate possesses excellent suspension stability and flavor. The process used to produce the soy protein isolate includes an enzyme hydrolysis process, and the resulting soy protein isolate can be used in acidic beverage formulations.

Rejuvenation of used cooking oil (Rao, R., and others, Nixon Peabody, LLP, May 1, 2008, US20080102181A1).

Implements for decolorization, deodorization, and deoxidization of used or filtered spent cooking oil are disclosed to improve on the service life of cooking oil and the health aspects of fried foods. This can be achieved on a small to large scale by simple implements filled with a mixture of plant-based granulated activated carbons and antioxidants, wherein the implements can be immersed in a frying appliance, such as a pot, a vat, a pan, a deep fryer, and the like, containing used oil or in a storage unit of filtered oil. The overall safety, palatability, and economics of a food preparation process are determined by the ease of oil containment and cleanup during and after frying with oil.

Gelled vegetable oil condiment utilizing glycerol and hydrophilic microparticulate silicon dioxide (Perlman, D., Wesley B. Ames, May 1, 2008, US20080102186A1).

An orally dispersible, substantially water-free edible oil-based gel composition for food use, that typically contains between 74% and 99% by weight triglyceride-based edible oil, up to 2.0% by weight hydrophilic microparticulate silicon dioxide, between 0.1% and 1.0% by weight of at least one edible polyol, less than 1% by weight water, and less than 25% by weight of additional suspended solids. The polyol and the silicon dioxide have been fully dispersed in the oil-based composition to cause gelling of the edible oil. The composition commonly includes added flavoring agents and can include flavor enhancers.

Zero trans fat margarine (Syed, A., Suiter Swantz PC LLO, May 1, 2008, US20080102187A1).

A margarine product, comprising a first fat, a second fat combined with the first fat, and an oil setting agent combined with the first fat and the second fat. The oil setting agent further comprises a mixture of polyglycerol esters of fatty acid (PGFA) and mono- and diglycerides (MDG) and an aqueous solution comprising at least 20% of the margarine. The first fat, the second fat, and the oil setting agent combine to form at least 80% of the margarine product.

Zero trans fat edible spread (Syed, A., Suiter Swantz PC LLO, May 1, 2008, US20080102188A1).

An edible spread product comprising a first fat, a second fat combined with the first fat, an oil setting agent combined with the first fat and the second fat, the oil setting agent further comprising a mixture of polyglycerol esters of fatty acid (PGFA) and mono- and diglycerides (MDG), and an aqueous solution comprising at least 50% of the edible spread product. The first fat, the second fat and the oil setting agent combine to form at least 50% of the edible spread product.

Lipase powder compositions (Negishi, S., and others, The Nisshin OilliO Group Ltd., May 1, 2008, US20080102500A1).

The present invention provides a lipase powder composition which comprises a filter aid(s) and a product obtained by pulverizing a Thermomyces sp.-derived lipase immobilized to a silica carrier(s) into the average particle diameter of 1 micron or more and less than 300 micron. This lipase powder composition improves the lipase activity and operability and, therefore, can be suitably used in the methods for exchanging esters of fats and oils and for esterification.

Method for the high-speed detection and/or measurement of a lipase or phospholipase activity (Verger, R., et al., Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, August 14, 2008, US20080193958A1).

One of the great lions of lipase research, Professor Verger, is still busy inventing. This invention relates to a method for the detection and/or measurement in vitro of a lipase or phospholipase activity, characterized in that it comprises: the addition of a sample likely to contain said lipase or phospholipase into the wells of microtitration plates coated with a layer of a lipid substrate which is able to be hydrolyzed by said lipase or phospholipase by releasing α-eleostearic acid, the detection and/or the measurement of the lipase or phospholipase activity by ultraviolet spectrophotometry of the α-eleostearic acid released during the previous stage. The invention also relates to the application of the above-mentioned method to the in vitro diagnosis of pathologies linked to an increase in the plasma lipase level.

Catalyst-free process for the manufacture of a fatty acid ester oil polyol (Kazemizadeh, M., Arkema Inc., May 8, 2008, US20080108782A1).

The present invention relates to a manufacturing process for producing a polyol from a fatty acid ester in situ. The process does not use any added organic or inorganic acid catalyst. The polyol produced by the process is essentially free of any cation or anion. The fatty acid ester oil epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions can occur progressively in the same reactor for essentially a one-pot reaction. The polyol produced by the process is essentially free of any cation or anion. The polyol can be used to produce polyurethanes having improved properties.

Biodiesel production with enhanced alkanol recovery (Maliszewski, T., and others, Nick C. Kottis; Pauley Petersen & Erickson, May 15, 2008, US20080110082A1).

Processes for making biodiesel are improved by rapidly vapor-fractionating a crude biodiesel containing alkyl ester, lower alkanol, and a catalytically effective amount of base catalyst to obtain a lower alkanol fraction having a low content of water without undue loss of alkyl ester despite the presence of active catalyst.

Compound coating with reduced saturated fatty acid levels (Nalur, S., Winston & Strawn LLP, June 5, 2008, US20080131564A1).

An ice confection having an ice confection core and a snappy outer compound coating layer that has a reduced saturated fatty acid content. The fat in the compound coating is a mixture of fractionated palm oil and a liquid oil such as canola oil, sunflower oil, soybean and corn oils. This compound coating has similar textural characteristics to that of conventional products.

Vegetable oil lubricating composition (Stunkel, B., and Aguilar, G., R.T. Vanderbilt Company, Inc., June 5, 2008, US20080132434A1).

A lubricating composition includes, in weight percentage, at least 90% of a vegetable oil, and an additive composition including: (i) about 1.5 to 2% triphenylphosphorothionate (TPPT), (ii) about 0.1 to 3% hindered phenolic antioxidant, (iii) about 0.05 to 0.25% 1-[di(phenyl)aminomethyl]tolutriazole, and (iv) about 0.05 to 0.5% alkyl succinic acid half ester rust inhibitor.

Peroxide reduction in functionalized vegetable oils (Denoux, M., and others, Daniel Reitenbach; Chemtura Corporation, June 5, 2008, US20080132712A1).

Disclosed is a method for the reduction of residual peroxides in vegetable oils, preferably epoxidized vegetable oils, using a phosphorus compound preferably alkyl/aryl substituted phosphite compounds or hypophosphorous acid and its derivatives.

Process for the recovery of a phytolipid composition (Zima, G., and others, Eastman Chemical Company, June 12, 2008, US20080138450A1).

Disclosed is a process for the recovery of a phytolipid composition from a vegetable oil by-product. The phytolipid composition produced comprises squalene, phytosterols, mixed tocopherols and tocotrieneols, and vegetable wax, and is useful as an emollient. The phytochemical composition may be applied directly to the skin to provide emolliency. Alternatively, the phytolipid composition may be formulated in various aqueous or anhydrous cosmetic compositions such as creams, lotions, gels, ointments, lip balms, sticks, or pencils for treatment of the skin and lips. The phytolipid composition also may be incorporated into foods, beverages, and nutraceuticals to provide health benefits.

Process to obtain biolubricants and bioparaffins by hydroprocessing mixtures of wax obtained from renewable resources and waxes of mineral origin (Fontes, A., and others, Petroleo Brasileiro S.A.-Petrobras, June 5, 2008, US20080132435A1).

Process for hydroconversion of loads of mixtures of waxes from renewable resources that may be made up of waxes of mineral origin or waxes of animal origin, that may be used in their pure form or mixed in any proportion, that may optionally be combined with loads of hydrocarbons of mineral origin, as is the case of waxes obtained from petroleum, by industrial treatment. This mixture flow is submitted to a hydrotreatment and hydroisomerization/hydrofinishing process and the referenced process takes place under the usual hydroconversion conditions, in the presence of a hydrogen stream and hydroconversion catalysts, resulting in obtaining products referred to as biolubricants and bioparaffins, that present characteristics of being biodegradable and less of an environmental pollutant.

Rapid fatty acid assay for use in pulp pitch control (Jiang, C., et al., Enzymatic Deinking Technologie, April 3, 2008, US-20080078519A1).

Methods are provided for determining the surface fatty acid content in a wood pulp or whitewater sample. The methods comprise reacting free fatty acids which are present on the surface of the wood pulp fibers in the sample or in the whitewater with one or more reagents to form a measurable species, and determining the fatty acid content.

Process for production of acrolein and other oxygenated compounds from glycerol in a transported bed reactor (O’Connor, P., et al., Bioecon Internat Holding NV, May 8, 2008, WO-2008052993A2).

Disclosed is a process for the production of acrolein and other oxygenated compounds from glycerol. Use is made of an acidic catalyst in a moving bed reactor at 200–650°C.

Soy-based polyols (Suppes, G., et al., University of Missouri, May 15, 2008, WO2008-058097A2).

The invention provides processes for converting an unsaturated molecule to a polymer. In particular, the processing steps comprise bodying, epoxidation, hydrolysis, and oligomerization. These processes provide new processing paths for the formation of polyols for use in rigid foam and other applications.

Guggulphospholipid methods and compositions (Ahmad, A., et al., Jina Pharmaceuticals Inc., May 15, 2008, WO-2008058156A2).

The present invention relates to the methods for preparing synthetic guggulphospholipids, their fatty acid analogs, and other bioactive molecules.

Use of structured plant protein products to produce emulsified meat products (Sandoval, A., and Orcutt, M., Solae LLC, May 22, 2008, US2008-0118607A1).

The present invention provides emulsified meat products that include animal and simulated meat compositions. In addition, the invention also provides processes for producing the emulsified meat products utilizing animal meat compositions and simulated meat compositions. In the process, the simulated meat composition includes structured plant protein products that are utilized to produce an emulsified meat product with an improved texture.

Process for the preparation of powdered oils (Bastiaans, J., and Poortinga, A., Friesland Brands BV, May 28, 2008, EP1925211A1).

The present invention relates to a process for the preparation of powdered oils and more particularly to oil encapsulated in a protein-containing matrix. In addition, the present invention relates to the powdered oils obtainable by such a process, and the use of these products in the preparation of food compositions, and preferably animal food compositions, such as ruminant food compositions.

Processing of natural oil-based products having increased viscosity (Ward, D., Cargill Inc., May 29, 2008, WO2008063595A2).

Methods for the removal of volatilizable components from a natural oil-based product having a high viscosity are provided. The natural oil-based product can be a high-viscosity oligomeric polyol prepared from epoxidized vegetable oils.

Peroxide reduction in functionalized vegetable oils (Denoux, M., et al., Daniel Reitenbach; Chemtura Corporation, June 5, 2008, US20080132712A1).

Disclosed is a method for the reduction of residual peroxides in vegetable oils, preferably epoxidized vegetable oils using a phosphorus compound preferably alkyl/aryl substituted phosphite compounds or hypophosphorous acid and its derivatives.

Enzymatic oil interesterification (Pearce, S., et al., Novozymes North America Inc., June 25, 2008, EP1934362A2).

The present invention relates to a process for enzymatic lipase interesterification of oils containing a chelating agent by sequential or simultaneous treatment with a base.

Fatty acids and fatty acid esters as herbicidal agents and carriers (Jones, A., Intellectual Property/Technology Law, June 26, 2008, US20080153708A1).

A composition and method for killing unwanted plants using fatty acids and fatty acid esters as herbicidal agents and carriers for herbicidal agents are described. Compositions of such type can be applied to areas containing both desired and undesired plants, to kill the undesired plants without harming the desired plants.

Novel elongase gene, and process for the preparation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (Heinz, E., et al., Novak Druce Deluca + Quigg LLP, July 3, 2008, US20080160054A1).

The invention relates to a novel elongase gene or analogs, vectors or transgenic organisms, and a process for the preparation of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Lipid bilayers on nanotextured solid surfaces (Lopez, G., et al., Gonzales Patent Services, July 3, 2008, US20080160313A1).

The present disclosure provides various novel suspended planar lipid bilayer assemblies made from bicellar mixtures containing long- and short-chain phospholipids and methods of making the same. Such bilayer assemblies may additionally incorporate biomolecules such as proteins, polypeptides, biological complexes, transmembrane proteins, and other membrane-associated compounds.

Methods of hydrotreating a mixture made up of oils of animal or vegetable origin and of petroleum cuts with intermediate stripping (Bertoncini, F., and Marchand, K., Millen, White, Zelano & Branigan, P.C., July 3, 2008, US20080161614A1).

The invention relates to a hydrotreating method using two plants working under different operating conditions with an intermediate stripping for co-treating a mixture made up of oils of vegetable or animal origin and petroleum cuts (gas oil cuts and middle distillates) in order to produce gas oil fuel bases meeting specifications. The first plant treats oils of vegetable or animal origin in co-mixture while pretreating the hydrocarbon feed, whereas the second plant produces diesel fuel.

Fully automatic fuel system for diesel engines operated with diesel and vegetable oil (Karner, P., Peter Karner, July 10, 2008, US20080163854A1).

Vegetable oil fuel system for diesel engines consisting of a diesel and vegetable oil system. When started cold, the engine is supplied with diesel and when the engine reaches a certain temperature, the fuel supply switches to vegetable oil. During normal operating conditions, the engine runs on vegetable oil heated by a heat exchanger supplied by engine cooling water. In addition, the vegetable oil is electrically heated when passing through the filter during cold start conditions.

Method and apparatus for assessing purity of vegetable oils by means of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (Zhao, Z., et al., Westman Champlin & Kelly, P.A., July 10, 2008, US20080165364A1).

The present invention relates to a method for assessing the purity of vegetable oils by means of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The method according to the present invention is easy, rapid and quantitative.

 

Updated March 5, 2010